Archive for the Circular Category

Mythophage

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , on October 15, 2010 by ellocogringo

Mythophage

A cocatonation of Mythos (plato) and phage (parasite)

P=password or protected

The Blind Spot Afflicts 99.953% of the population. An extiction maker.

The Lattice – Block on constructivist thinking. Imposed by education to force conformist thinking.

The Taboo – on pride. Imposed by religion and upbringing. Imposes subservience.

Centering – has been disrupted by the efforts of others to control us

Misogyny – Discourages “woman think”

Mr Sid thinks of it as the left mind being noun driven and thr right mind being verb driven. LifeIsAVerb

Mr Ted thinks of it as conjugate pairs SingleDime

(1949) is a book by the philosopher Gilbert Ryle. In it, he describes what he saw as a “fundamental mistake” made by Descartesdualism, which underlies much of western philosophy. In the work, Ryle coined the phrase, “the dogma of the ghost in the machine,” to refer to Descartes’ model.

The fundamental error, according to Ryle, is a category mistake made when philosophers talk about mind and matter as if they were, “… terms of the same logical type.” Ryle claims that while it makes sense to talk about mental processes and events, that the

“… phrase ‘there occur mental processes’ does not mean the same sort of thing as ‘there occur physical processes,’ and, therefore, that it makes no sense to conjoin or disjoin the two.”

For Ryle, Cartesian dualism mistakenly assumes it is sensible to ask of a given cause, process, or event, whether it is mental or physical (with the implication that it cannot be both). ConceptOfMind

Getting it less wrong Paul Grobstein Pragmatism

If all this stuff is known, why is everyone so dumb?

 

Wheels

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , on October 9, 2010 by ellocogringo

Time is central to holding together the power mode of ego. Yet…..what, exactly, does a clock measure? Nothing. It is an artificial structuring of the natural ebb and flow of the universe. In and of itself, that’s ok. It alows the synchronization of activities for maximum effect. BUT…………..we forget that “time” isn’t linear in reality, nor is it circular as the amerind worldview. It is fluid, depends on our experiencing of the universe. The universe just is, and is not required to adhere to our artificial attempts to control it, whether linear or circular.

I recently became interested in the aboriginal framework of reasoning. I have heard it described as circular reasoning.
Circular reasoning is an attempt to support a statement by simply repeating the statement in different or stronger terms. In this fallacy, the reason given is nothing more than a restatement of the conclusion that poses as the reason for the conclusion.
I don’t see it that way, I see it as “wheels within wheels” and not even “what goes around comes around” but “what goes around comes around goes around etc”. For instance a 260 day calendar would seem to make no sense unless one considers that the gestation period is 260 days. Thus if a woman conceived on Tzolkin 10 she could expect the birth on Tzolkin 10, As this was synchronized with the Haab (365 day calendar) no calculation was needed.

Occidental’s dominate thought mode is top down (left mind) Orientals dominate thought mode is bottom up (right mind) time to the right mind appears to be situational. Orientals have the same problem (mirrored) that we have in the west. IE whereas we have difficulty with connectness (bottom up), they have problems with analysis. (top down). In general this seems to be a determining factor in civilization, ie one or the other minds must be shut down to turn the populace into robots. This difference is illustrated by the response to communists in Singapore. They didn’t understand the war. “a thousand years from now no one will even know who the communists were” That’s a little too much connectedness to my way of thinking.

While circular time is certainly closer to reality than linear time. It is not reality. Reality, and reality only, is reality.

This imprinting is canabilastic in nature, like the zombie, it want’s to eat your brains. It is the Ayn Rand Beast.

Inclusional Panerind Shaman TheBeast Timelessness Circular EverythingForever Frustration Art Cherokee

Spirals

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , on September 8, 2010 by ellocogringo

Spirals

Collecting dots for later connecting. Click on images to enlarge.

What started me off on this was the sundagger. What rang my bell on this particular spiral was the nature of the carving. i.e. they were tracking two somethings. This carving wasn’t pre-surmised but a record of past occurances. What were they tracking?

Somehow this is related to the Mayan concept of time.

I recently became interested in the aboriginal framework of reasoning. I have heard iT described as circular reasoning.
Circular reasoning is an attempt to support a statement by simply repeating the statement in different or stronger terms. In this fallacy, the reason given is nothing more than a restatement of the conclusion that poses as the reason for the conclusion.

I don’t see it that way, I see it as “wheels within wheels” and not even “what goes around comes around” but “what goes around comes around goes around etc”. For instance a 260 day calendar would seem to make no sense unless one considers that the gestation period is 260 days. Thus if a woman conceived on Tzolkin 10 she could expect the birth on Tzolkin 10, As this was synchronized with the Haab (365 day calendar) no calculation was needed.

The same holds true of the Aztec Calandar. From 1000 BCE, most of Central America used similar types of calendars based on material objects and celestial constellations. The two most common calendars were the 260-day festival calendar and the 365-day solar calendar. The correlation between the two occurs every 52 years when both begin their new years. This is called the “Calendar Round” and the number became important in Central American cultures.

Incas seemed to follow the same pattern. The inca calendar day by day counting system was follow from observation stations, where all movements of the sun, moon, stars, solstice, equinox and all types of celestial phenomenons were observe, register and predicted; The inca observation stations are know today as Intihuatanas, but their real name is Intiguata, word that splits in Inti, that mean sun and Guata that mean year.

All other manifistations of the spiral were calculated. Maouri, hindi, golden ratio etc.

Ron Eglash has some interesting stuff to say on the topic African Fractals as does Edward Tregar. Crystal links is a cornucopia of data on the topic. That all of these things are related seems too obvious to mention. To say that it symbolizes the sun god, or repeating celestial patterns is trite. These are myths only, used to explain observations. The question remains, why? The chaco spirals are archetypical, more pristine observations, whereas the other spirals are stereotypical. Or, you could say, the others are a sub-set of the chaco spirals. I am not to the point of formulating an answer, I’m still working on the question. eLG has flagged the chaco spirals as an inconsistent consistency. It is after the fact. It is what was, not what is to be. You’ll never convince me that a people who could figure out the sundagger were incapable of a more esthetically pleasing carving. Does not compute.

“To wade through all the examples, the statements, and the speculations would entail very prolonged study, and need a diligent as well as a clear brain to escape utter confusion of memory. The process, however, even if nothing else came of it, would be very useful to those who, living in a narrow little world of their own interests, have no idea of the great rivers of thought that, unknown to them, are in far-off and little-known places bearing day and night their tribute to the ocean of human knowledge. Only one of these rivers—nay, a stream—can be approached in this paper, but my writing may tend to show not only how little I know, but also how little any other man knows about things close to us and regarded as common and devoid of interest”.Edward Tregear

Chaco Canyon was a “sacred place” WHY? The Maya had a sacred Island Cozumel. Why? Lookout mountain was considered a sacred place as was machu pichu. Why? It would appear that the chaco canyon spirals are primal with the others being copies. Wisdom was acquired at chaco canyon and transfered as knowledge to other places “not sacred”. What is different about chaco canyon, and cozumel, and lookout mountain from other places?

If you discount the myths as being effects rather than causes, not a lot is left. Could it be that these places were where things like the sundagger can occur? Astronomical necessity? I’m still formulating the question. What is unique?

SacredPlaces Selfinger IslaDelSol SunMoon CrystSpiral wikipedia Notice Chaco Maori Math Koru Natlib mancala CrystSwastika About Symbols Inca Calandar Machu Picchu CalandarWheel Wiki Zoso Chaco Bell

Protected: Obvious

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 16, 2010 by ellocogringo

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Brain Soup

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , on August 16, 2010 by ellocogringo

Inclusive <===> Collating —> Pathfinder

Amerind Iterative concept processing

Different from the western top down/bottom up processing which correlates non inconsistencies, the amerind concept processing appears to iterate between inclusive and collating modes until consistencies are exclusively resolved when it flips over to the pathfinder mode, presenting in an inclusive serial mode.

Fascinating.

Or………………….I could be full of shit, I am crazy, don’t you know

 

Protected: Panerind

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2010 by ellocogringo

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Cherokee Nation

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 7, 2010 by ellocogringo

CherokeeNation

Yup! Fucking sucks doesn’t it? Trail of tears bites big time. I’d like to step back and look at this from a broader perspective. We can’t get too maudlin, it serves no purpose. War is part of the human condition, probably always will be. I think of ant wars. The individual ants are like the individual in society. The good of the individual has been subsumed by the good of the society. In the case of ants, the activity is determined by pheromones. In the case of humans, ideology. But it’s the same thing. Mindless robots executing their programming. The question becomes, as supposedly intelligent beings, how do we rise above this programming? We’re heading for extinction if we don’t. Amerind, tamil, western, ALL. We no longer live in the paleolithic.

I intended to write about the cherokee nation. eLG thought I was missing the point. Needed to look at the big picture. Anybody know who the Aquitains are? I thought not. Even most Aquitains don’t. Cherokee got off lucky, they killed all the Aquitains, save one. A culture subsumed by a culture which was subsumed by yet another culture ad infinitum. There’s your wheels within wheels. Sometimes that’s the only choice there is, to die on your feet or live on your knees.

Consider the statue of the dying Gaul. He had just killed his wife and is about to kill himself. Romans respected that, and in fact glorified it. Doesn’t matter, they killed them all anyway. We are ALL survivors. None of us have a lock on rightousness. We have to get past this us/them mentality before we go extinct.

Ceaser’s really starting to get on my nerves.

“Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli appellantur ” – Ceasar

As to what happened, Amerinds (not all but some) picked the wrong side in the revolution. That is, they became conquered enemies rather than victorious allies. The diaspora would not have occured.

Unicode syllabary CherokeeNationSong CherokeeNationWeb

Chaco Bell

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , on August 1, 2010 by ellocogringo

Chaco And so, what does it mean? I know what it means to a European, but what does it mean to an Amerind? If one considers that Europeans are linear thinkers and the Amerind circular (iterative) it is highly unlikely that the meanings are the same. The spirals, as are all I’ve seen, seem an after the fact thing. not a prediction but a history, which can be used as a prediction. (since what came around, will again) It’s like they were tracking two somethings and relating them to each other and to the equinoxes and solstices. but what?

In the Mayan calendar (wheels within wheels) two of the measurements were 260 days and 365 days. the gestation period is also 260 days, so this system made calculation to figure out the date of birth unnecessary. the spiral patterns appear to just be another visualization of this thought process, but the question remains “what were they tracking?” what is the unknown dimension to this happening?

People like to sprinkle pixie dust on something and claim they own it. Any time an anthropologist digs some structure up and they don’t know what it is they call it a temple. A thousand years from now they will dig up a McDonald’s and proclaim it a temple devoted to Ronald McDonald, with french fries and onion rings as symbolic gifts and the coke dispensers for ablutions. It doesn’t matter what we think of it, the question is what did the Amerind think of it.

If a myth, i would like to point out that a myth develops to support an observation, not the other way around.

The human mind is wired to make sense of things, even if there’s no sense to be made out of the situation. the platonic solids come to mind. A lot of “sense” there, but so what? they don’t appear to have a relationship to anything except each other.

Our minds are wired differently.

Protected: inclusional/exclusional

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 22, 2010 by ellocogringo

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shaman

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 26, 2010 by ellocogringo

Shamanism

Feminine God

“A religion old or new, that stressed the magnificence of the universe as revealed by modern science, might be able to draw forth reserves of reverence and awe hardly tapped by the conventional faiths. Sooner or later, such a religion will emerge.” – Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot (1994) – www.pantheism “Soul retrieval is a Shamanic skill used to heal a person from illness. Shamans believe that all illness comes from losing power or giving power away to something or someone. It may be spirits from the Inner World that you have traded your soul power with to get fame or fortune or love. It may be a living being who has an energetic cord attached to you and is sucking part of your soul away. It can be a generational soul loss that happened many years ago with your grandfather or great grandmother that you are not even aware of that has taken away part of your family soul. Soul loss can also be caused by a traumatic experience, a car accident, a sudden death in the family, a violent crime, a chronic illness. These things can cause a loss of vital power or energy and that power and energy, a part of one’s wholeness, must be restored to bring health and healing of body mind and spirit back to the patient.” – soul_retrievalThis is the DreamCatcher, found here Gitchie Golly!! as Gomer would say. Doesn’t that sound a lot like “do no allow someone to occupy rent free space in your mind”? Hmm! in fact one could almost say the shaman is doing a QD Fix. Or that the shaman is de-idiotizing the victim. Or the generational soul loss could be described as epigenetics. Or traumatic experience as PTSD. Or the soul as the center leaving a “hole in the soul”. The minds work the same way they always have and always will. This is the insight, the mystery, the wonder that has been dismissed by western civilization as metaphysical bullshit. This works. The words and the mysticism may be different due to wetware, but this works. Check QDFix, Oracle and EarthLady

How Odd! Not only am I the Maylene Muse but also the Shelby Shaman
Another bunch I ran into were the Tupi. Like most countries in latin america there is a spanish upper class and native lower class. From the Amazonian rain forest comes one of the most potent catalysts for expanded awareness yet discovered by human beings. In Ecuador and Peru this medicine is known as Ayahuasca, a Quechua Indian word meaning, ironically, “vine of the dead”. In Columbia and parts of Brazil, the Tupi Indian name Yage (pronounced Ya-hay) is used, and among Amazonia’s proliferating mestizo relious cults it is called Daime…

“Ayahuasca” as a hallucinogenic substance does not properly refer to one single plant, but to a singular mixture of two very different plan species…there is no such thing as an “ayahuasca plant,” or a “yage plant”, any more than there is a simple liquor simply called “Martini.” Ayahuasca correctly refers to a psychedelic combination of plants which varies in potency according to the skill of its maker.

While each shaman has his own secret formula for the mixture (with probably no two exactly alike), it has been established that true ayahuasca always contains both beta-carboline and tryptamine alkaloids, the former (harmine and harmaline) usually obtained from the Banisteriopsis caapi vine, and the latter (N, N-dimethyl-tryptamine, or DMT) from the leaves of the Psychotria viridis bush. (There may be variations among plant species, but the alkaloids are always consistent.


Lakota Medicine Wheel

……………………………………………………………..

Medicine Wheel Part 1 Part 2 Part 3

an ancient symbol that traces back 10,000 years in the Americas. Among the different tribes which have used it, the medicine wheel has served both as a map of the cosmos as well as a ceremonial and contemplative tool, a means of honoring and interacting with the world’s elemental forces and intelligences

Brain Soup Wheels Panerind Cherokee In/Ex Art

 

So what does it all mean? Well I think the feathered medicine wheel above looks like the steering wheel I had on my Studillac. Oh! you expected something more profound. I’ll have to call in the omniscient, all knowing, all seeing munificent professor emeritus maharishi el Loco Gringo. The Amerind worldview is the same as any other neuron trellis used to access the right mind directly. A method of obtaining a wider perspective on life. A method for understanding rather than just knowing, mans interactive relationship with the cosmos. Good shit. Fascinating.

This is probably the most difficult post I have ever attempted. You have no idea how hard it is to find an Amerind in the lotus position. But I felt impelled to get that foxy looking shaman online.

Amerind Art

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , on June 23, 2010 by ellocogringo

Just some eye candy. No message. This is just some samples of what I’ve found cruizing the net. The first picture isn’t Amerind, I just thought it was kinda kool. The rest have links and are well worth exploring if your interested in Amerind art leave a comment and I’ll continue adding….walt

 

 

AmerindArt Found here> http://www.thegreasygrass.com/ggtrail.html

Cherokee Nation Half Breed

These Images found here< http://www.myspace.com/texasrockartist

Found Here> http://www.myspace.com/texasrockartist

These images found here>http://ofearna.us/art/frizzell.html

Indian Shaman

winterSharron Evans

Death by side slip

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 13, 2010 by ellocogringo

QD Fix Chrysalis Reset

in a message dated 9/12/2010 8:04:18 P.M. Central Daylight Time, emiliano@goodshare.org writes
walt,
our culture is habituated to making deals with the devil. the power to live longer and more comfortably is being paid for by our children and grandchildren, … anthropocentrism rules, … we are not just giving up the first born, we are giving up any other creatures than ourselves..
its not a question of what a new technology will do for long term ‘humanity’, its a question of what it will do for those humans who have the money to buy it. ayn rand wouldn’t think twice if the quality-and-longevity-of-life technology dedicated to the few drained the global resources so as to, at the same time, lower the quality and longevity of life of the many.

re ‘side-slipping’.
when i am heavy into it, i can hardly remember my our history, my time based life story-line.
i think that’s what happens in dementia, … people go into side-slip mode and they lose their historical story-line.
i go back and forth but sometimes i wonder if ‘death-by-side-slipping’ is not possible, to become one with everything in a spatial sense and lose one’s historical story-line entirely.
it seems to me that inductive and deductive logic only pertain to the historical story-line, the apparent causal lineage.
relational logic doesn’t care about time, it only cares about spatial relations. after all, the world in terms of spatial relational dynamics is never-ending so why rush? if you happen to step in there one day and really chill out you may never come back and reclaim your historical story-line.
ted

Hi Mr Ted
side slipping
Damn, you’re right. I’ve been aware of this for 50 years, and never thought to work the logic both ways. Dementia’s not the right word, but there isn’t one. Lost the time line? left mind went bye bye? logos fail? rufus may says lost the plot? top down fail?
That’s exactly what’s happening with a nervous breakdown, or whatever the psycho babble term du jure is.
the top down logic tree has been ripped out and the dendrites have to find new homes for recovery to occur.
WOW!

As an aside, when Mr Ted made the observation about side-slip, I instantly SNAPed. The correlation had already been made but was determined by the left mind to not be relevant.
walt,

Protected: Dogtrack

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2010 by ellocogringo

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Bonking Polly

Posted in Circular with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2010 by ellocogringo

We often think that when we have completed our study of one we know all about two, because “two” is “one and one.” We forget that we still have to make a study of “and.” Arthur Eddington
in re your chapter, I’d like to look at the and. Your observations are valid, your conclusion is valid, your deductions are valid, but the “why” is a problem. You’re painting yourself in a corner.
We have two minds operating on 3 levels, perception/interpretation, logos/mythos and weighting.
Setting perception/interpretation aside for the moment I’ll look at the mythos side (bottom up) your abduction.
The right mind can be considered a primarily a input data collating device which keys on not inconsistencies, (if it hasn’t been hijacked) an AND boolean network with output of consistent, not consistent, inconsistent and not inconsistent. These are 4 seperate and distinct logic patterns. In english you would say best answer to date, this idea seems to work for the moment, could be and bullshit. The outputs may be contradictory or even mutually exclusive. The left mind “looks” at this output and picks the most likely. Weighting is a tie-breaker. (reticulum) To see this process in action picture charlie chimp in the paleolithic pondering whether to bonk polly protohuman. “the last time I bonked polly, how many times did the alpha male hit me and how hard?” based on this collated information the left mind can make a yes/no decision.
The left mind however is primarily a data discarding device, shitcanning redundant and irrelevant data. For instance on the perceptual level, you walk into your office look around and sit down. So you’ve seen it once, that’s all it takes if there are no inconsistencies. (a boa in your chair you might notice) from this point on no matter how many times you look around the room, you do not “see” it, but see the stored memory of the room. There is no need to process the visual information more than once. Been there, done that. Your line drawings of the logic tree are right, by the way. But they are inverted between top down and bottom up IE the output of the bottom tree “best answer to date” becomes the first hit on the top down tree.
You see Mr John, you only think you’re thinking. (usually) It takes 8 seconds to start thinking. What is actually happening is you are pulling up pre-collated concepts. The possibility of the thought has already been considered. If it hasn’t you get that “deer in the headlight” look. WTF? precludes pre-surmising.
If this hasn’t sent you screaming for the exit, here’s a link.
http://ellocogringo.wordpress.com/2010/07/06/mind-1/